Planning a me-made capsule wardrobe with MyBodyModel: Bujo Edition

Planning a Me-Made Capsule Wardrobe: Bujo Edition

A multi-passionate creative at heart, Raylene planned a comfy, polished, & versatile me-made capsule wardrobe using her sewing bullet journal and her personal croquis from MyBodyModel. Read on to see Raylene’s beautiful and organized 2-page bujo planner spreads, and how she chose 6 garments to create more than 12 outfits!


I’ve been wanting to create a me-made capsule wardrobe for the longest time. Due to the lockdown and being at home 24/7, I got bored of wearing pajama bottoms and leggings with boring but decent-looking tops just so that I could look somewhat presentable in my Zoom calls for work. I felt like I needed to pay more attention to the way I presented myself even while I was at home. I wanted a way to throw together an outfit that is effortlessly chic, a little wardrobe that I wouldn’t have to think about, but also comfortable that I could easily chill in bed with it.

Planning sewing ideas in my sewing bullet journal
Planning sewing ideas in my sewing bullet journal

I got to work, and used MyBodyModel croquis to plan what I was going to make in my sewing bullet journal. I was heavily inspired by the “Dressed” ebook by Deer & Doe, and after evaluating my current lifestyle, I knew I could come up with a collection that would work for me. 

Upon doing a google search for capsule wardrobe inspiration, I came across a Youtube video by Christie Ressel where she discusses the concept of “modules” which are essentially collections of clothing items that are cohesive. The six pieces in one module includes 1 outer layer, 3 tops and 2 bottoms. Each top needs to go with each bottom, so if you created a 6-piece module, you could create 12 outfit combinations using this formula.

When I heard this I was sold! I set out to start planning mine, so before I get to the creation of my actual capsule wardrobe, let me take you on a little journey on how I came up with it.

The first thing I did was to figure out what my personal style was by going into a Pinterest rabbit hole. I made a private board with outfits, colours and styles that I am drawn to. Then I analyzed the overall board and started to list the common thread or themes running through.

My sewing moodboard in my bullet journal with fabric swatches, inspiration images, and garment line drawings traced over my body model croquis.
My sewing moodboard

I noticed that I am very drawn to autumnal colours and themes – rust, brown, black, tan, khaki, off-white, as well as small scale dark florals and animal prints. I also noticed that I prefer feminine and flowy silhouettes, but paired with contrasting elements like chunky black boots or a leather jacket.

I then set out to work on my capsule wardrobe spread in my sewing journal. It took a few tries, but I eventually came up with a layout that works for me.

My DIY Capsule Wardrobe Planner: 2-page spread in my sewing bullet journal
My DIY Capsule Wardrobe Planner spread in my sewing bullet journal

On the left page I narrowed down my wardrobe colours to six and below that I created a little moodboard using fabric swatches, cutouts of pictures I found on Pinterest as well as some little line drawings I created using MyBodyModel as a template.

Close up of the left page in my 2-page sewing bullet journal Capsule Wardrobe Planner spread: Color palette, fabric swatches, and mini mood board including garment line drawings made by tracing over my body model croquis
Close up of the left page in my Capsule Wardrobe Planner spread in my sewing bullet journal

On the right page I made a list of all the wardrobe staples I know I love to wear, or would like to experiment with in the future. I separated these into six categories – Outerwear, Tops, Dresses, Skirts, Pants and Other. An example of something that would fall in the “other” category is a jumpsuit.

Close up of the right page in my 2-page sewing bullet journal Capsule Wardrobe Planner spread:  My wardrobe staples and reference list of possible 6-piece capsule collections
Close up of the right page in my Capsule Wardrobe Planner spread in my sewing bullet journal

At the bottom of the page on the right I created my version of Christie Ressel’s modules and called them Collections. The idea is that each collection is cohesive and builds upon the previous, making the possibility of outfit combinations practically endless! I came up with four more 6-piece mini collections that I could create so that I don’t get too bored with the same six pieces, and labelled them A, B, C, D and E.

Based on this naming convention, my first collection is called Collection A #001. I added the #001 because I could end up creating more of the same collections in future. The main aim of this is to make creating a capsule collection more manageable when I know I only need to create six pieces at a time.

Next, it was time for me to create my first 6-piece collection! I then set out to create a sewing journal spread that I could use for future collections, and after lots of brainstorming, I finally came up with a spread that works for me.

A plan for my first 6-piece capsule wardrobe collection! I designed this 2-page sewing bullet journal spread with the idea that I could use the same setup for future capsule plans. I used my croquis from MyBodyModel to draw the garment line drawings on the left and the outfit sketches on the right.
A plan for my first 6-piece capsule wardrobe collection!

On the left, you can see I labelled it Collection A #001, and below that I created a space for my fabric swatches. The little numbers below each swatch corresponds to the number I gave them in my swatch book. I have swatches of all my fabrics with details in that binder. I had to do this because I have a huge fabric stash, and it helps me stay organized. That, and I love flipping through it time and time again for a much needed dose of inspiration.

As I perused my swatch book, I ended up choosing five fabrics for my collection. I wanted to make a top and a bottom in the same fabric to give the illusion of a dress which is why there aren’t six.

My fabric swatches for my capsule Collection A #001. I chose mostly rayon twills for the fabric, and went with a colour scheme of black, khaki, tan and dark floral.
My fabric swatches for my capsule Collection A #001

I chose mostly rayon twills for the fabric, and went with a colour scheme of black, khaki, tan and dark floral. All of these fabrics are cohesive and work really well together.

Below the fabric swatches, I created line drawings using MyBodyModel croquis of all the patterns I chose to make, and after much brainstorming, I chose the following patterns for my first collection:

1. True Bias Ogden Cami

2. Deer & Doe Dressed La Blouse

3. Deer & Doe Dressed Le Chemisier

4. Helen’s Closet Winslow Culottes

5. Helen’s Closet Donovan Skirt 

6. Helen’s Closet Pona Jacket

Close up of the left page in my 2-page sewing bullet journal Capsule Wardrobe Planner spread:  My selected fabric swatches and patterns, with line drawings traced over my croquis from MyBodyModel. Patterns are Pona Jacket, Ogden Cami dress, Winslow Culottes, Donovan Skirt, and Deer & Doe La Blouse & Le Chemisier.
Close up of the left page in my Collection Planner spread in my sewing bullet journal

On the right page, I created a layout featuring 12 of MyBodyModel croquis where I sketched out all the outfit combinations I could come up with based on the patterns and fabrics I have chosen.

Work in progress: I printed my body model croquis and sketched line drawings of each outfit before pasting them in my sewing bullet journal.
Work in progress: I printed my body model croquis and sketched line drawings of each outfit before pasting them in my sewing bullet journal.

Here’s what the Outfit Combinations page looked like when finished:

Close up of the right page in my 2-page sewing bullet journal Capsule Wardrobe Planner: 12 outfit combinations sketched on my body model croquis. Patterns include Pona Jacket, Ogden Cami dress, Winslow Culottes, Donovan Skirt, and Deer & Doe La Blouse & Le Chemisier.
Close up of the right page in my 2-page sewing bullet journal Capsule Wardrobe Planner: 12 outfit combinations sketched on my body model croquis.

I had so much fun coming up with these outfit combinations, I even created paper doll style cutouts using MyBodyModel croquis. It reminded me so much of my childhood.

Playing with my body model paper doll to test outfit combinations for my me-made capsule wardrobe. Patterns include Pona Jacket, Ogden Cami dress, Winslow Culottes, Donovan Skirt, and Deer & Doe La Blouse & Le Chemisier.
Playing with my body model paper doll to test outfit combinations

Whenever I work on a new pattern, I always create a spread for it in my sewing journal. I created a layout like this for all six of the patterns I chose. I use these spreads to plan out my makes and get all project packs together – equipped with notions or trims required. I also indicate if I have pre-washed my fabric, and make notes of the seam allowances and any adjustments if need be.

My favourite part of the spread is doing MyBodyModel sketches of the front and back of the pattern. I do these as line drawings so that I can see all the style lines.

A sample project planning page setup in my sewing bullet journal, with space for fabric swatch, notes, and of course, my fashion sketch on my body model croquis. This is my sewing plan for the Donovan Skirt by Helen's Closet.
A sample project planning page setup in my sewing bullet journal, with space for fabric swatch, notes, and of course, my fashion sketch on my body model croquis. This is my sewing plan for the Donovan Skirt.

My project planner detail page is also great for documentation. When I go to make a pattern in the future, I can use this as a quick reference instead of having to rummage through all my patterns and potentially creating a confusing mess!

Next, onto the fun part!

Coming up next, I’ll share my finished makes using the outfit combinations that I planned using MyBodyModel croquis.

I had so much fun making all the garments knowing that I was doing it with a solid plan in mind.  Stay tuned for outfit photos!


Have you tried designing your own mini-capsule collection? Do you use a bullet journal to plan and document your wardrobe? Let us know in the comments below!

For more mini-capsule planning inspiration, check out the #mybodymodel3x3 hashtag and these recent blog posts:

Also, check out the “Work from Home Module Sewalong” organized by TomKat Stitchery on YouTube and Instagram!


Did you enjoy this post? Please comment, pin, and share!

Raylene planned a polished & versatile capsule wardrobe using her sewing bullet journal and her personal croquis from MyBodyModel. See her beautiful and organized 2-page bujo planner spreads, and how she chose 6 garments to create more than 12 outfits!

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17 thoughts on “Planning a Me-Made Capsule Wardrobe: Bujo Edition”

  1. Your beautiful journal has inspired me to do something similar. Actually I think I am going to follow your entire process as it makes total sense to me. I have 6 fabrics which I planned to make into a capsule collection but sorting out the combinations in my head isn’t working for me. The paper doll idea is a total winner. I can’t wait to see your finished outfits.

  2. Hi Claire,

    Thanks so much for your amazing feedback! This makes me so happy to hear. And yes, do try out the paper doll method. Your MyBodyModel croquis makes this process so easy and fun.

    I cannot wait for you to see the finished outfits 🙂

    – Raylene

    1. Hi Meghann,
      Thank you! I use dual tip Copic Classic markers. I’ve seen it being used by fashion designers, because you can layer the colours or use different stroke techniques to get amazing textures and depth.

  3. Pamela Shadle Flores

    This is beautiful! And it’s the most logical, approachable method for capsule planning I’ve seen. Thank you so much for not only doing the work but for your generosity to share it!

  4. I love my bullet journal and now want a second one gor organizing all of my sewing projects. Thank you for such beautiful examples of your project spreads!

  5. Hello Raylene!
    I had a quiet moment to sit down and open emails yesterday; I’m So Thankful I opened My Body Model and found your interview, which led me here. You have truly inspired me! I love how grounding your practices are, and I love that you give yourself permission to take the time to daydream, plan, prepare, and gather before the actual garment construction takes place. I needed to “see” this permission in action to give myself permission to do the same. Thank You for sharing so much with the sewing community.

    1. Hi Kathy,
      Wow, thank you so much for your amazing feedback. It makes me so happy to hear that it has inspired you to do the same. Thank you for connecting!
      – Raylene

  6. Pingback: My first me-made capsule wardrobe – Scarlet Stitch

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